From Maguire to Winks: which England hopefuls might make the plane to Russia?

first_img1) Butland hardly tested but should stay second choiceDespite having made his England debut in August 2012, Jack Butland had to wait three years for his competitive bow and another two to double the tally when lining up here. England qualified for Russia 2018 on Thursday so here was invaluable game-time for the 24-year-old Stoke City goalkeeper. Yet the contest gave Butland scant chance to show he can be relied upon. The man most likely to dislodge Joe Hart watched an early Fiodor Cernych shot carefully, then gathered a later one with ease. This was all that was required until just after the half-hour. Then, he dealt with a Kieran Trippier backpass by booting it towards halfway. On 54 minutes Butland did make a crucial save, though, by stopping Michael Keane scoring an own goal. Butland is next in line after Hart, ahead of Fraser Forster, Jordan Pickford and the injured Tom Heaton, and competitive action will have done his confidence no harm.Make the plane? Yes Lithuania Harry Kane penalty gives England win in Lithuania to end qualifying campaign Share on Messenger World Cup 2018 qualifiers Share on WhatsApp features Topics World Cup 2018 Share via Email England 4) Maguire’s dream could take him all way to RussiaHarry Maguire’s debut came close to a dream start five minutes in as the central defender lurked near Setkus’s goal. Yet when Cresswell delivered the ball where the Leicester City man – an ever-present this season – wanted it, Maguire spurned the header. But accomplished defending is his prime concern, and at this the 24-year-old was largely reliable on the left of Southgate’s trio of centre-halves. Yet it was his error that allowed Lithuania to turn defence into attack and which led to Keane nearly scoring an own goal after the interval. Earlier he made amends for the missed header by initiating the attack from which Harry Kane opened the scoring. It was Maguire’s clever dinked ball to Henderson from which Dele Alli won the penalty, converted by Kane. Again, though, competition is fierce. Gary Cahill, Phil Jones, Chris Smalling, John Stones, and Keane are those who are ahead in the reckoning.Make the plane? Outside chance5) Trippier gives it his all in quest to be on the planeOne of four Tottenham players in the XI, Kieran Trippier made an uneven start but he improved as the contest developed. After winning their first corner the 27-year-old allowed Vytautas Andriuskevicius to find a cross from which Darvydas Sernas flashed wide of Butland. This was followed with a diagonal ball that was intercepted and he later failed to get close enough to Sernas. From here, though, Trippier began hustling better and was a constant outlet along the right, though he was not always noticed by team-mates. When he was – by Kane, just after the latter’s penalty – Trippier used the ball aptly by moving it inside quickly to Winks. This second England appearance ended as a note to Southgate that he is worth consideration. With Kyle Walker first choice, Trippier’s competition appears to be only Nathaniel Clyne, who is injured, and perhaps a left-field option, like Manchester United’s Ashley Young.Make the plane? In balancecenter_img Share on Facebook Share on Pinterest Read more World Cup Martin O’Neill’s odd gumption could be key to beating Wales in Cardiff Share on LinkedIn 2) West Ham’s Cresswell can deliver a set pieceInside five minutes Aaron Cresswell made an impact by hitting a cross in from the left that landed plum on Harry Maguire’s head and which should have led to the opener. A later free-kick from the right again showcased Cresswell’s ability to strike a ball as the defender spun in a cross that posed the Lithuania defence a question. The West Ham United defender had been handed a third cap and chance to further his claim for a World Cup berth in a defence that featured three centre-backs. In this the 27-year-old operated at left wing-back, a demand familiar to him as his club manager, Slaven Bilic, uses the system. Cresswell was near faultless and when pushing ahead suggested he can be a factor: a second-half header forced Ernestas Setkus into a sharp save. Ryan Bertrand and Danny Rose – who is injured – are ahead of him, while Luke Shaw and Ashley Young may also change Gareth Southgate’s mind.Make the plane? Outside chance3) Winks tidy but may be too late to join the partyHarry Winks could be proud of a first taste of senior international football as the 21-year-old offered a tidy all‑round midfield display. The Tottenham man often roved forward to link though on occasion his control let him down. Winks’s first contribution in an England shirt was to beat Vykintas Slivka with some slick footwork. Later he combined with Marcus Rashford but the latter ball watched. Next came an illustration of Winks’s energy as he raced back to break up a Lithuania attack. While he came close to a first England goal early in the second half, the challenge he faces comes from those players ahead of him in Gareth Southgate’s thinking. Winks was only drafted into the squad after Fabian Delph dropped out. The Manchester City midfielder, Jordan Henderson, Eric Dier, Adam Lallana, Jake Livermore, and even a consistently fit Jack Wilshere are those whose claim is stronger.Make the plane? No Read more Share on Twitter Reuse this contentlast_img read more

How to retain more donors through recurring giving

first_imgI recently had the chance to host a webinar with two of Network for Good’s DonateNow customers, Renee O’Donnell from SIFF and Katie Matney from The Women’s Fund of Central Ohio. Our goal was to understand how they’re retaining more donors through recurring giving at their respective organizations. With 70% of donors never returning to make a second gift, we were eager to learn from two peers who are building and retaining a large sustaining network of recurring donors.While SIFF is primarily membership-based, The Women’s Fund of Central Ohio takes a more traditional view of recurring donors through their 1,000 Women campaign; however, during our Q&A session we uncovered four common themes despite the different approaches.Here are four takeaways for executing a successful recurring giving program for your organization:1. Start donors as recurring donors. A small, monthly recurring gift is an easy entry point for donors. A gift of $10 or $15 a month is easier to budget for than a gift of $50, and with services like DonateNow, those donations can be automatically processed—no extra effort for you or your donors. Our data shows that recurring donors give 42% more over the course of 1 year than a one-time donor does. In addition, your recurring donors will likely do more than just make a recurring gift. For both SIFF and The Women’s Fund of Central Ohio, recurring donors make additional one-time gifts throughout the year, attend events, and encourage their networks to support and donate. In short, these recurring donors are the most loyal and generous supporters over time.2. Thank donors within 48 hours. In addition to any automatic tax receipts you send after every donation, thank your donors for every gift within 24 to 48 hours. A thank-you letter, hand-written note, or phone call within that time frame is one of the easiest things you can do to keep a donor giving. However, for recurring donors especially, listen to the donor’s feedback. If a donor doesn’t want an acknowledgement every month, don’t send one. Listening and responding to a donor’s wishes makes him or her feel heard and appreciated—and more likely to give for longer! Both Katie and Renee suggest that fundraisers make thank-yous a team effort and involve everyone in their organization. Remember, it’s your donors who allow you to continue your mission.3. Have a plan to engage donors once they get in the door. I love how Katie from The Women’s Fund described planning for the relationship you want with your recurring donors: How are you going to pick up these donors and take them with you on this ride towards social change? Keep your donors involved with frequent email updates, but pepper in personal touches. Take your recurring donors to coffee, write them a quick email, hold special events for them, and ask them for their feedback.Giving is highly personal, so make sure you understand what inspires your donors to give.4. Make it manageable. The above advice may sound like it requires a lot of effort. While that can be true, both Renee and Katie offered tips to make this work at your organization:Have a plan. Recurring donors are your most loyal supporters and they should be treated like it! Map out how your organization interacts with recurring versus one-time donors. Those with recurring gifts should receive more frequent communications. It’s easier to save time if you’re following a thought-out strategy and process, so set aside some time upfront for planning. Make sure your plans allow you to achieve success. Don’t promise you’ll send hand-written thank you notes to each donor if you don’t have the resources. Instead, strive toward a signed letter from your executive director within 24 hours. Make small but regular progress. By making a habit of doing something small every day to improve either the number or loyalty of your recurring donors, you’ll create a habit that allows you to be more effective and successful over time. Check out the article by Gretchen Rubin: “Best Advice: Make A Habit of Something Every Day.” Katie credits it for helping her start and maintain her donor acknowledgement program.Thanks to both Katie and Renee for sharing their stories with the Network for Good community! For more tips on making recurring giving a part of your fundraising strategy, listen to the full recording of this webinar, Getting Donors to Give Again and Again: The Secret Recipe.last_img read more

3 Tips for the Ultimate Donation Experience

first_imgEach year, our Digital Giving Index shows that the online donation experience matters. Donors are more likely to give (and more likely to give larger donations) when they are presented with a donation page that keeps them in the moment of giving. In this video, Annika Pettitt from Network for Good’s Customer Success Team shares three key elements that will make your online donation page more effective and help you reach your fundraising goals.For expert guidance on creating a donation page that inspires donors to give more, register for the free Ultimate Donation Page Course.last_img read more

What Your Peer-to-Peer Fundraising Campaign Is Missing

first_imgThe ultimate success of your campaign hinges on one key factor: personality. If your P2P campaign is missing this element, you’re not just missing the opportunity to create something magical, you’re missing out on donations.So, how do you ensure your peer fundraising campaigns have the kind of personality that will make others take notice and be inspired to act? Here are three ideas:Let go, just a little. It can feel a bit scary to let go of your message, but remember: letting your fundraisers share their own passion, in their own words, is a powerful thing. This is the kind of authenticity you can’t come up with all by yourself, especially when your goal is to reach the friends and family of your supporters, who will be moved by such a personal message. In most cases, their message in their words holds the most influence.Stories beget stories. Once people start sharing their personal experiences, it often inspires others to do the same. To get the ball rolling, ask a few of your staff, volunteers, or beneficiaries to share their stories in writing, photos, or video to stoke the emotions that will draw out the passion in your donors turned fundraisers. Connect them to why they gave in the first place.Give a nudge. Quite simply, if you want people to include their stories, you gotta ask. Seems obvious, but your fundraisers will need a little guidance and encouragement. Give them a few prompts or templates to work from, but remember to allow (and push) for creativity and personality. Your online fundraising tools should give your fundraisers plenty of opportunity to make their message their own.Want to learn how the right peer-to-peer fundraising software can help your supporters tell their story and share their passion? Schedule a demo and see our software in action! Peer-to-peer fundraising can help even the smallest organizations spread their message and attract new donors. These peer-driven campaigns tap into the networks of your supporters allowing you to expand your reach beyond your list.But the real power of turning your donors into fundraisers is not just about the multiplier effect. It’s about harnessing the personal stories and passion of those who care about your work. A generic copy and paste doesn’t begin to realize the full potential of a peer-to-peer fundraising campaign powered by testimonials, personal experiences, and emotion of individual fundraisers.The ultimate success of your campaign hinges on one key factor: personality.last_img read more

10 months agoDi Natale backing Luis Muriel for success at Fiorentina

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Di Natale backing Luis Muriel for success at Fiorentinaby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveFormer Udinese striker Antonio Di Natale is backing Luis Muriel for success at Fiorentina.The pair played together at Udinese before Muriel left for Sevilla.“If he came to Florence with the desire to prove what a great player he really is, then I am sure he’ll do brilliantly,” Di Natale told La Repubblica.“Muriel is a player who can make the difference. He can play as a support striker, but in Stefano Pioli’s 4-3-3 system it’ll be very similar to the role he had with me at Udinese.“I can picture him doing really well on the left of the Fiorentina trident, with Federico Chiesa on the right and Giovanni Simeone in the centre.“He’s a striker who likes to move around a lot, taking opponents on with his pace. You’ll see he will focus a great deal on that.” last_img read more

Part 1: What Women Want and Need vs. What They Get

first_imgPosted on September 4, 2014November 2, 2016By: Petra ten Hoope-Bender, Director of Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn and Child Health, ICS Integrare; Sheetal Sharma, Research and Knowledge Management Associate, ICS IntegrareClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post is part of our “Continuum of Care” blog series hosted by the Maternal Health Task ForceEsther has walked for 10 kilometers in the dusty red soil to her district health post in Mafinga, Iringa, Tanzania. She thinks she is pregnant; her belly is growing and her dada mkubwa (big sister) has said, “inaweza kuwa hivyo,” (it might be so) and she should go see a daktari (doctor).She enters the clinic and there is a long queue. Over 30 women are waiting, some with their babies, growing impatient; they have to go back home to their chores or to the shambaa (field). She is told that the nurse-midwife only works until lunchtime because she has to go to the next village to give vaccines. The nurse-midwife tells Esther that she needs to do a test but can’t because they are out of stock. Maybe Esther can buy it at the local duka ya dawa (pharmacy)? She also tells Esther to come regularly to the clinic to have her belly, weight and blood pressure checked and make sure she takes her iron and folic acid tablets. But the clinic is only open three mornings a week, so Esther may have to come multiple times in order to be seen even once.Overwhelmed, Esther wonders how she will manage over the next few months.So what is the care Esther received? Some of the standard questions we use to assess this include:Did she go to care in her first trimester of pregnancy?Has she had her four antenatal check-ups?Was she attended by a skilled birth attendant?To answer those questions, Esther would show the tablets she received, and say a doctor gave them to her because the provider wore a white coat. On any health-related census or household survey, Esther would be included as having received adequate care even though her care was far from adequate.But have we really measured the quality of care she received?To measure quality of care, we should ask Esther more detailed questions: whom she sees at the antenatal clinic and what is available there. Did she have access to vaccines, vitamins, antibiotics, and weighing scales? Did she feel she could easily access the antenatal services, with both the permission and monies to go? Were the services acceptable or respectful; did she feel she could ask any questions or be seen in privacy? Was it comprehensive antenatal care she received? Was she reassured during her pregnancy and counseled on what to expect and how to deal with emergencies? Was she advised where to have her baby and did she feel that she can visit the clinic at any time?In the Lancet series on Midwifery, we started our discussion and research from the perspective of what women and newborns need. We knew without evidence there is no basis for change. We also knew that for all women—including those like Esther—sexual, reproductive, maternal, and neonatal health (SRMNH) services need to shift from fragmented care to integrated care. The series shows that this care should be provided by a team of educated, regulated health care professionals working in an enabled health system delivering quality maternal and newborn care (QMNC). QMNC incorporates not only what type of care is delivered, but also how its organized and delivered. This includes quality care practices and optimising normal processes and using interventions only when indicated while showing respect for women and tailoring care to their needs. We developed a framework that brings this all together:QMNC FrameworkSource: Renfrew MJ, et al. Midwifery and quality care: findings from a new evidence-informed framework for maternal and newborn care. Lancet. 2014.What does this mean for the care providers?Care providers are hard put to deliver quality care outside an enabled environment. If you cannot provide the health care women need, communicate with colleagues, or refer women with complications, at some point you’re going to hit a wall. The QMNC framework can help health workers better define which care to provide and how. In addition, the framework identifies the support health workers need to deliver quality care and how education, regulation and an effective health care system contribute to building this support. In culmination of this research, a set of pragmatic steps for addressing the quality of SRMNH services has been created to facilitate moving from skilled care for some to quality maternal and newborn care for all.Stay tuned for Petra’s follow-up blog on this topic next Tuesday, September 9th.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:,This post is part of our “Continuum of Care” blog series hosted by the Maternal Health Task ForceEsther has walked for 10 kilometers in the dusty red soil to her district health post in Mafinga, Iringa, Tanzania. She thinks she is pregnant; her belly is growing and her dada mkubwa (big sister) has said, “inaweza kuwa hivyo,” (it might be so) and she should go see a daktari (doctor).She enters the clinic and there is a long queue. Over 30 women are waiting, some with their babies, growing impatient; they have to go back home to their chores or to the shambaa (field). She is told that the nurse-midwife only works until lunchtime because she has to go to the next village to give vaccines. The nurse-midwife tells Esther that she needs to do a test but can’t because they are out of stock. Maybe Esther can buy it at the local duka ya dawa (pharmacy)? She also tells Esther to come regularly to the clinic to have her belly, weight and blood pressure checked and make sure she takes her iron and folic acid tablets. But the clinic is only open three mornings a week, so Esther may have to come multiple times in order to be seen even once.Overwhelmed, Esther wonders how she will manage over the next few months.So what is the care Esther received? Some of the standard questions we use to assess this include:Did she go to care in her first trimester of pregnancy?Has she had her four antenatal check-ups?Was she attended by a skilled birth attendant?To answer those questions, Esther would show the tablets she received, and say a doctor gave them to her because the provider wore a white coat. On any health-related census or household survey, Esther would be included as having received adequate care even though her care was far from adequate.But have we really measured the quality of care she received?To measure quality of care, we should ask Esther more detailed questions: whom she sees at the antenatal clinic and what is available there. Did she have access to vaccines, vitamins, antibiotics, and weighing scales? Did she feel she could easily access the antenatal services, with both the permission and monies to go? Were the services acceptable or respectful; did she feel she could ask any questions or be seen in privacy? Was it comprehensive antenatal care she received? Was she reassured during her pregnancy and counseled on what to expect and how to deal with emergencies? Was she advised where to have her baby and did she feel that she can visit the clinic at any time?In the Lancet series on Midwifery, we started our discussion and research from the perspective of what women and newborns need. We knew without evidence there is no basis for change. We also knew that for all women—including those like Esther—sexual, reproductive, maternal, and neonatal health (SRMNH) services need to shift from fragmented care to integrated care. The series shows that this care should be provided by a team of educated, regulated health care professionals working in an enabled health system delivering quality maternal and newborn care (QMNC). QMNC incorporates not only what type of care is delivered, but also how its organized and delivered. This includes quality care practices and optimising normal processes and using interventions only when indicated while showing respect for women and tailoring care to their needs. We developed a framework that brings this all together:QMNC FrameworkSource: Renfrew MJ, et al. Midwifery and quality care: findings from a new evidence-informed framework for maternal and newborn care. Lancet. 2014.What does this mean for the care providers?Care providers are hard put to deliver quality care outside an enabled environment. If you cannot provide the health care women need, communicate with colleagues, or refer women with complications, at some point you’re going to hit a wall. The QMNC framework can help health workers better define which care to provide and how. In addition, the framework identifies the support health workers need to deliver quality care and how education, regulation and an effective health care system contribute to building this support. In culmination of this research, a set of pragmatic steps for addressing the quality of SRMNH services has been created to facilitate moving from skilled care for some to quality maternal and newborn care for all.Stay tuned for Petra’s follow-up blog on this topic next Tuesday, September 9th.last_img read more

Celebrating National Social Media Day

first_imgThere’s no denying it. Social media is the fastest-growing phenomenon of the modern age. It even has its own day of celebration—and it’s tomorrow!That’s right. In 2010, Mashable launched Social Media Day to celebrate and recognize the power and connectivity of social media.This year we’re sharing our favorite aspects of social media. So get on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram, and join us on June 30, with #SMDay.What We #LoveSocial Media Helps NonprofitsBuild trust within your community.Deepen your relationship with your audience.Expand your outreach and network.Promote your events.Drive people to your website.Add personality to your organization.Provide real-time engagement with your followers.Social Media Inspires DonorsAccording to Nonprofit Source:55% of people who engage with nonprofits on social media end up taking some sort of action.59% of those people donate money and 53% volunteer.57% of people who watch nonprofit videos go on to make a donation.30% of nonprofits use Instagram to raise money and awareness.Twitter users send 700% more visitors to donation pages on #GivingTuesday than on a typical day.In an average peer-to-peer fundraising campaign, 15-18% of donations are referred directly from Facebook.The quality of your engagement with your social media followers directly translates to the subscribers to your e-newsletter, and even your donor base. Use your donor management system to track who came to you from social media. Post regularly about how to donate and get involved with your organization. Encourage them to share your posts with their networks and create a ripple effect to build your own followers, supporters, and donors; and communicate with them where they are the most—on social media.What We #ShareThere is no other method of communication as effective at instantly putting your message in front of thousands of people. Some of the best shareable content we’ve seen nonprofits post on social media include:Fundraising campaigns (launches, status updates, fundraising events).Non-promotional (holiday party photos, office pot-lucks, candid staff shots, new staff member introductions, trivia, opinion polls, contests).Press and Announcements (grants and awards, organization mentioned in news, job postings).Events (community events, performances, panel discussions, town halls).Program Updates (number of people served, new sponsor information, locations, and partners).Relevant external news (articles about your area of focus, blogs by experts in the field,community affairs).Download our eGuide “Social Media for Nonprofits,” for more on the top social media sites and how to use them to your advantage, including a social media strategy checklist. And follow us on Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn.last_img read more

7 Steps to Simplify Your Fundraising Plan

first_imgThe number one indicator of individual donor fundraising success is having a plan. You know you need one—and one you can stick to. The question is: how do you create a really solid plan?Don’t let writing a fundraising plan overwhelm you. It’s not as complex as you might think. Check out these seven steps and download our Super Simple Fundraising Plan to get the ball rolling. Before you know it, you’ll be a planning pro!Step 1: Reflect on the past year.Review your fundraising activities and results from the previous year. Use your donor management system to analyze your data and answer these essential questions:How much did you raise from each of your individual donor activities?What were your biggest successes?What were your biggest challenges?Step 2: Identify your resources.Take stock of your organization’s resources (money, staff time, board, volunteers, technology, etc) and how they can support your fundraising efforts in the coming year.Step 3: Name the activities you have to find new donors, renew current donors, and upgrade donors.Create a plan that includes specific tactics to attract, renew, and upgrade donors. Each donor segment requires a different approach. All three together can significantly increase the amount you raise year after year.Step 4: Create your goals for each activity.What do you want your planned fundraising activities to accomplish? Beyond dollars raised, your goals may include acquiring a certain number of new donors, increasing board involvement, or engaging younger donors. Make sure your goals are SMART: specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, and time-bound.Step 5: Identify your three focus areas for the coming year.Most organizations judge their success by one question—did we meet our financial goal? Growing future giving means investing in activities that will make a difference in the future even if they don’t generate immediate revenue. Identify three things that you want to make happen this year and build them into your organization’s fundraising plan.Step 6: Put it on the calendar.Whether you use Outlook, a calendar app, or a desktop planner, plan out your activities for the coming year. Be sure to prioritize around vacations, programmatic events, and potential busy times for the organization.Step 7: Make resolutions to set yourself up for success.Have you made your fundraising resolutions for the year? What will get you to stick to your brilliant plan now that you’ve made it? Whether it’s an accountability partner, a set hour on your calendar every week to review the plan or call donors, put it on the calendar. And don’t forget regular check-ins with your team to evaluate your progress.Download the Super Simple Fundraising Plan today and utilize our interactive worksheet to make notes for every step of your plan.Read more on The Nonprofit Bloglast_img read more

Why Don’t Adolescent Mothers Use Maternal Health Services?

first_imgPosted on March 1, 2017March 1, 2017By: Sarah Hodin, Project Coordinator II, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Vulnerability of adolescent mothersBetween 1995 and 2011, roughly one in five girls living in developing countries became pregnant before she turned 18 years old. Adolescent girls, particularly those living in low-resource settings, are uniquely vulnerable during pregnancy and childbirth. Girls who become pregnant between the ages of 15 and 19 are 50% more likely to die during childbirth compared to women between 20 and 24 years old. In fact, complications during pregnancy and childbirth are the second most common cause of death among girls between 15 and 19 years old. Furthermore, babies born to adolescents are at greater risk of being delivered preterm, having a low birth weight and dying as infants.Receiving high quality care during pregnancy, delivery and postpartum is critical to reducing maternal and newborn deaths. Despite the vulnerability of young girls during this period, the literature on maternal health care utilization among adolescents is scarce.Influential factorsA systematic review published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth examined the factors influencing adolescent mothers’ utilization of maternal health services in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Based on available studies, the authors identified the strongest factors related to the utilization of antenatal care (ANC), skilled birth attendance (SBA) and postnatal care (PNC), summarized in the following table. Antenatal careNot applicableX ParityX An X indicates that the majority of studies that included the factor in their analysis found statistically significant relationships.The findings from this review illustrate that girls with the following characteristics are less likely than their counterparts to utilize maternal health services in LMICs:– Lower socioeconomic status– Lower education level– Husband with lower education level– Live in rural areas– Not exposed to mass mediaGirls who were pregnant with their first child were more likely to have SBA than girls who had given birth previously. Additionally, ANC utilization was a strong predictor of having SBA, and having SBA was a strong predictor of utilizing PNC.When interpreting these results, however, it is important to consider that the review is based on limited evidence; the studies were conducted in diverse settings and examined different factors; data on adolescent health—especially among non-married adolescent girls—is inadequate in many settings, and certain factors may be more influential in some places than others.Moving forwardThe authors note the paucity and poor quality of research in this area and call for efforts to fill this gap. For example, there have been no qualitative studies examining maternal health service utilization among adolescents. Qualitative methods would be ideal for exploring adolescents’ experiences, beliefs and perspectives related to care and learning about the challenges they face as young mothers.Addressing the unique needs of adolescent mothers and pregnant girls is an essential component of accomplishing the goals set forth in the Global Strategy. Additional high quality quantitative and qualitative research in diverse settings is an essential first step towards increasing adolescents’ utilization of maternal health care.Source: Banke-Thomas et al. Factors influencing utilization of maternal health services by adolescent mothers in low- and middle-income countries: A systematic review. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 2017.—Read the full article.Learn more about adolescent sexual and reproductive health.Subscribe to receive new posts from the MHTF blog.Share this: Rural/urban residenceXX Antenatal careSkilled birth attendancePostnatal care WealthXXXcenter_img Mass media exposureXX ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Girl’s educationXXX Use of a skilled birth attendantNot applicableX Husband’s educationXXlast_img read more

Upcoming Webinar: A Global Survey of Skilled Birth Attendants

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on April 3, 2018April 5, 2018Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Please join the Fistula Community of Practice (FCoP) on 10 April 2018 at 9:00 am Eastern Daylight Time for a webinar sharing findings from a global survey of skilled-birth attendants (SBAs) in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The survey examined SBAs’ training, knowledge, practices and facility environment as they relate to intrapartum and postpartum bladder care and management of prolonged/obstructed labor.Prolonged/obstructed labor (P/OL) is a major cause of maternal mortality and morbidity, including obstetric fistula, other forms of incontinence and nerve injuries. Bladder care is an important part of routine intrapartum care and plays an important role in postpartum management of P/OL. Urinary catheterization (UC) in the postpartum period is recommended to help prevent obstetric fistula and may help treat a proportion of “fresh” fistula.However, little is known about current knowledge and practices among SBAs regarding intrapartum and postpartum bladder care, including the feasibility and acceptability of UC for care after P/OL. To fill this gap, the Fistula Care Plus (FC+) project conducted a key informant survey of SBAs to better understand the range of intrapartum and postpartum clinical practices in LMICs, as well as to describe SBAs’ knowledge and the resources available to them (e.g., protocols, in-service training and supplies).Join us to hear the first report on survey findings, including notable differences and disparities between regions and facility types/settings. FC+ staff will present the findings from this global SBA survey and maternal health experts will discuss program and research implications, particularly for midwifery training and practice.Registration information:“A Global Survey of Skilled Birth Attendants on Intra- and Postpartum Bladder Care and Management of Prolonged/Obstructed Labor”Date: 10 April 2018Time: 9–10 am (EDT)Where: GoToWebinarRegister for the webinar here>>After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.Webinar presenters:Elly Arnoff: Program Associate for Evaluation and Research, Fistula Care PlusSheena Currie: Senior Maternal Health Advisor, JhpiegoVandana Tripathi: Deputy Director, Fistula Care Plus—Learn more on the Fistula Care Plus website.Read the Maternal Health Task Force (MHTF)’s mini-series on obstetric fistula:[Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3].Browse other upcoming maternal health-related events.Share this:last_img read more