MY TOP 10 MOMENTS…

first_imgRachel Grant Well for my last official written piece for TFA, I thought I would do ‘My top 10 moments or things’ during my time with TFA.1)      The staff at TFA…may well sound corny but I doubt you will ever come across a group of people more dedicated to their work. There have certainly been some difficult times for the sport, and currently still are, but these people give 100% in everything they do and really want to see the sport succeed. They take a lot of flak everyday and continue to put the sport first. I have a lot of respect for these people as both my work colleagues and my friends and will miss them dearly.2)      The volunteers Australia-wide…There are so many volunteers in our sport that do so much work for so little reward or even thanks, which makes them incredibly special people! Cathy Gray, Ian Matthew, Lou Tompkins, Dennis Coffey, the Australian Coaches and staff, technical panel members and more. There are so many others that work incredibly hard at a local level doing so much for the sport, like Matt Wood from Woolgoolga Touch, who comes along to all TFA events at Coffs Harbour and gives up his days to help with the event. I want to thank everyone who I have worked with for the way you give yourself so selflessly to the sport. I cannot finish number 2 without mentioning Lisa Plummer, my media off-sider who has provided so much friendship, help and assistance with national events and the monthly newsletter and also the boys ‘From the Fishbowl’, Adam and Kane. They have amused us at recent National 18’s and NTL’s with their wit and humour, while expertly providing commentary and keeping the whole day in control. I will definitely miss their voices over the loudspeaker.3)      The 2005 Youth World Cup is easily the biggest event of my career to date, organising national and international media for the 6 Aussie junior teams and the event itself.The Youth World Cup had many ‘moments’, with some of the standouts including: ·         The South Africans singing in the Opening Ceremony·         The Mixed 18’s performing out of their skin to claim their title ·         The Thailand team being convincingly thrashed in every match but still showing the utmost respect to their team mates, officials, opposition and crowd·         The dramatic Mens 20’s final and the exceptional performance of the Aussies 4)      The Northern Eagles Mens 20’s winning the 2006 NTL was one of the most emotional sporting events I have ever been privileged enough to see. The boys, their support staff and their families all handled themselves so incredibly well after the traumatic events leading up to the NTL. 5)      The 2005 National Under 18’s saw for the first time, the celebrity match…and who could go past guest referee Tony Eltakchi in his finest form, the Jamaican Dr Bruce Watts, Kane Weeks letting no player stand in his way, Joe Williams letting his stepping do the talking, Peter Topp being sin binned and Eltakchi’s final penalty “penalty for being too good!” They had us all in stitches.   6)      Sixty Seconds in Touch has become my weekly ritual, a chance to sum up the happenings of the week and the upcoming events. A chance for people to advertise, announce and highlight important things. My awesome husband took it upon himself to design me a logo and the weekly edition has now become the most-read article on the TFA website with around 1000 people logging on each Monday to read it. I hope it will continue on!7)      Another memory comes courtesy of two of our young Touch stars who has gone on to play in the NRL, Benji Marshall and Joe Williams…Many will remember the AusTouch launch and National 18’s Opening Ceremony where Joe Williams fell off the stage but composed himself beautifully…how his chair managed to make it’s way to the edge of the stage is only a question Benji can answer. My thanks go to Joe and to Benji who always made themselves available for interviews, promoting the sport, talking and encouraging the up and coming junior players.8)      The TFA Media & Marketing Kit is something I’ve been working on for a few months and have madly been completing this last week. I created the final Master DVD on Friday and will leave TFA staff to produce a copy of the Kit for every affiliate. It contains marketing essentials such as posters, a television advert, a 3 minute promotional clip and plenty of helpful documents such as ‘How to write a Media Release’, ‘How to maintain your website’ and much more. It will be distributed Australia-wide to every affiliate over the coming weeks!9)      TFA staff put in an incredible amount of time and effort to produce the 2006 NTL Opens finals for the Fox Sports production. It would be remiss of me not to include it here as it was fantastic to see the sport back on the national airwaves and the show put on by the players in all 3 finals was fantastic.10)  The Touch-e-Talk newsletter has been running monthly for over 1 year now and I hope it will continue to get bigger and better…eventually to the stage where it can be printed and produced professionally…keep reading and keep supporting ideas such as this so TFA can get them off the ground.last_img read more

Let’s Get Together! 5 Steps to Combine Your Nonprofit’s Social Media and Email Marketing

first_imgEmail + Social = SuccessRemember that whether someone is a fan on Facebook or a subscriber on your email list, they’re a member of your online community. These are people who have opted to receive updates from your organization and are eager to show their support.By combining the power of social media and email marketing, you’ll be able to grow your community and get more from your marketing efforts in the years to come! 1. Make it easy to connect on your websiteThe first step to combining your social media and email marketing is making it easy for supporters to sign up for your mailing list or find your social networks directly from your website. Put buttons on your homepage for both so that when visitors find you, they can decide how they want to be engaged. Hopefully they’ll choose both!Tip: Need more help perfecting you nonprofit website? Check out this free eguide! As Constant Contact’s Content Developer, Ryan Pinkham helps small businesses and nonprofits recognize their full potential through marketing and social media. 5. Get more from your newsletter contentSharing your email newsletter content on Facebook or Twitter is a perfect opportunity to fill your social media content gaps.It’s also a chance to make better use of the content you’re already creating and get it the exposure it deserves. Sites like Facebook and Twitter will enable you to open your newsletter up to a whole new audience—not only your current fans, but also their friends who’ll see your content when someone else engages with it.And if the content in your newsletter isn’t time sensitive, you can wait a few days before you share it. This gives your emails a longer shelf life before you send another.Tip: If you’re thinking about taking your newsletter from print to digital, follow this guide. 4. Use consistent brandingWhether someone is visiting your website, connecting with you on Facebook, or seeing an email in their inbox, the experience they have with your content needs to be consistent. Not only in the quality of the content, but in the look and feel of your marketing materials.One way to do that is by using the same logo on Facebook and Twitter as you use in your email newsletter. That way, when someone does click through to become a fan or to read your newsletter, they immediately recognize that they’re in the right place.You should also pay attention to the colors you choose. The color scheme on your website is likely the scheme you’ll want to use in your email newsletter and, when possible, on Facebook. Color Cop is a free and easy-to-use tool that enables you to pull the exact colors from your website so you can implement them on other marketing content.center_img 3. Demonstrate your valueIf you want fans and followers to sign up for your email list, you need to make sure you’re demonstrating the value of doing so.In addition to having a clear call to action like Join my List!, you also want to include a description on the sign-up form telling people exactly what it is they should expect to receive. What type of content will you be sending them? How frequently will they get it? Is there any bonus or discount for subscribing? Tell people exactly what you plan to deliver and highlight why it’s great.The same applies when linking your newsletter to your social networks. Don’t just ask people to Like us on Facebook, explain why! If you’re already using email marketing and social media to promote your nonprofit, it’s important to unite your online communities—giving supporters the opportunity to stay connected with all the stuff you’re doing online and giving you the opportunity to better engage your target audience. Start by having your digital tools work together, here’s how: 2. Bring your audiences togetherEven if you’ve already connected your website to your social media pages or email sign-up form, it’s likely you still have some people who are seeing your content only via social media or are only receiving your newsletter.It’s crucial that you’re able to bridge that gap and bring those audiences together. One way is to include links to share content in your newsletters. Much like with your website, this will help turn readers into fans.On the flip side, you’ll also want to make it easy for fans to sign up for your announcements. Do you have a way to sign up for your newsletter on your Facebook page and in your Twitter bio? When someone sees all the interesting content you’re sharing through social media, don’t make them search for a way to sign up.Tip: If you’re a Constant Contact customer, you can easily add an email sign-up form to your Facebook Page.last_img read more

3 Tips for the Ultimate Donation Experience

first_imgEach year, our Digital Giving Index shows that the online donation experience matters. Donors are more likely to give (and more likely to give larger donations) when they are presented with a donation page that keeps them in the moment of giving. In this video, Annika Pettitt from Network for Good’s Customer Success Team shares three key elements that will make your online donation page more effective and help you reach your fundraising goals.For expert guidance on creating a donation page that inspires donors to give more, register for the free Ultimate Donation Page Course.last_img read more

Fundraising Ideas for Nonprofits – How to Create Your Own Donation Page

first_imgThe internet is not the only place where people get their news these days. It’s also where we connect with others, find entertainment, and research everything from how to fix a leaky faucet to how to get the best price on a cruise around the world. And, it’s where we bank and shop.Don’t Be Left Out of the Online CultureSince you know that your donors are doing all those things online, it only makes sense that you need to be there too with a donation website. You want to make it easy for donors to give you money, and since they are on the internet spending money already, that makes it the ideal place for them to make their charitable contributions.It isn’t difficult to set up a donation page, but there are a few things you should know. Network for Good offers two different products that feature donation sites—DonateNow and GiveCorps. Both allow you to set up a page where your donors can recognize your brand and choose the amount they want to give. But whether you use our products or not, here are the principles that you want to keep in mind when setting up your donation page.Your Donation Page Should Represent YouDonors want to know they are on a legitimate site, and your familiar branding will make them feel right at home. Design your page with the logo, colors and fonts that you use on your other promotions. Include familiar themes and any other images that people associate with your organization.Make Amounts VariableA popular technique in fundraising is to have preset giving amounts, and you should do that on your donation page, but be sure you also set it up so that donors can give any amount they choose. Some may not be able to give your recommended amount, but will be happy to contribute a little—and if you manage them well, with thanks and inclusion, even that small amount will make them feel like they are part of the solution, and lead to bigger donations in the future.The other reason for a variable amount is that you don’t want to limit the amount a donor can give. You never know when someone will be making a memorial gift, or other large contribution.Don’t Be ShyLet potential donors know exactly where to find the donation website. Put links on your main web pages and emails with “donate now” buttons. Put the URL in your printed materials too.Make online donations part of your call to action in talks that you give. Passing the hat will net a few bucks, but getting those same attendees to your donation site is likely to get a lot more. Let people know that you want them to go online and make donations—and make it easy for them to do so—and your donation page will become one of your best fundraising tools.Network for Good has a blog with more free information on how to be successful at nonprofit fundraising. We also have specialists available to discuss how we can help you get the most out of your fundraising efforts, so contact us today or call 1-888-284-7978 x1.last_img read more

The Two Absolute Requirements for #GivingTuesday Success

first_imgWhen I’m not wearing heels, I’m all of 5’1″ tall. I like to think of myself as “small but mighty” and I have developed a bit of an independent streak. (This might also be due to the fact that I was born on the 4th of July.) I feel this urge to prove to myself and the world that I am capable of tackling even the most herculean tasks … all by myself. Dragging an area rug into the office for an upcoming conference? Easy. Loading a U-Haul van full of furniture and a big screen television? No sweat. (Ok, maybe a little sweat.)I’m mostly proud of my independent nature, but it all comes down to balance. By being a DIYer, I sometimes miss the opportunity to tap into the rich support and expertise that I have in my network of friends and colleagues.Unfortunately, this is also what many organizations fail to do when planning events or considering new initiatives. But tapping into your network and empowering your people is how the magic happens (especially with big fundraising events like #GivingTuesday). Even if you are a small and mighty nonprofit who is used to doing things on your own, let’s agree to do it differently this year. It might feel a little uncomfortable, but it’s time to get out of your comfort zone. There are two things you absolutely must do for a truly successful #GivingTuesday campaign:Identify your team and activate your community.Even if you are the smallest organization, it is so important to consider the collective impact of your network and the expertise you can tap. A strong team with a dedicated leader will help you organize your efforts and move your campaign forward. These champions may be your staff, or they may be volunteers, board members, or other partners. And, without a passionate and active community, the energy and contagious enthusiasm of a great #GivingTuesday campaign is quickly lost. Beyond technology, your marketing message, or your fundraising goal, you simply cannot succeed without these two key pieces.There are 153 days until #GivingTuesday. Now is the time to create a plan for identifying your team and activating your community. Need some help? Download the Guide to a Successful Giving Day, then register for our free webinar later this month, where I’ll help you think through your strategy for #GivingTuesday, from assembling your team to writing effective appeals.last_img read more

5 Opportunities to Boost Giving, Donor Loyalty, and Job Satisfaction

first_imgNew research illuminates path to doing betterTake it from our peers in the field: Most communications and development teams aren’t communicating, cooperating, or collaborating with each other. Team goals are often quite different, with the two departments sometimes working at cross-purposes, unknowingly sabotaging fundraising results. But there’s good news: This disconnect is fixable.That’s the solid-gold takeaway from the 1,600 nonprofit communications and development staff members surveyed for the 2016 Nonprofit Communications Trends Report. Of respondents, 47% work in organizations with annual budgets under $1 million, and 53% work in organizations with budgets over $1 million, with the largest cohort in organizations with budgets in the $1 million to $5 million range.Donors come first, so goals and messages must be aligned.It’s a given that effective campaigns are about our prospects and donors, not about our organizations. That means donor outreach has to be unified, even if your team is split by goals or roles and responsibilities.There’s no way to provide that unified experience when communications and fundraising goals—and the activity that flows from them—are in silos. Instead, prospects and donors will be touched by a series of disconnected messages and visuals that don’t seem to come from the same organization. That’s a proven recipe for confusing the people whose help you need and deterring them from action.Unfortunately, that’s exactly what happens now in most organizations. According to the Trends Report (p. 5), communications and fundraising team goals diverge along these lines, with executive directors focusing somewhere in the middle:Development goals: Donor acquisition and retentionCommunications goals: Community engagement and brand awarenessFindings highlight five opportunities to do better.The good news is that by syncing fundraising and communications teams’ focus and activities—or, better yet, fully integrating them—we can do so much better. The Trends Report highlights three key findings and five significant opportunities to do better for our donors, our organizations, and ourselves. Win-win-win.Fully integrated communications and fundraising teams are more effective than separate teams or one team managing the other.Integration boosts communications staff ownership of fundraising goals by 400% and fundraising staff ownership of community building and engagement goals by 200%. (p. 8)Opportunity 1: You’ll have more hands and skills on deck to boost engagement and donations.Opportunity 2: You’ll get a clearer, broader understanding of possibilities and plans for engagement and community building, so you can sync fundraising campaign content and distribution accordingly. As a result, you’ll be able to craft touchpoints that look and sound like they come from a single organization and ensure that distribution timing and channels are honed for greatest impact.Opportunity 3: You’ll reduce conflict, delays, and duplication of effort in content creation, review, and approval. That will save time and effort and boost employee ease.Communications and fundraising teams have equal status and authority within organizations. (p. 25)Opportunity 4: Team members will have more to gain and little to lose in moving toward more collaboration or full integration. That means a greater likelihood that leadership and teams in more organizations will be motivated to make this radical change—and succeed in doing so. Members of fully integrated communications and fundraising teams (working for a single manager) are significantly more satisfied with their jobs. (p. 25)Communications Trends Report findings correlate staff members owning both fundraising and community engagement goals with greater job satisfaction.Opportunity 5: Finally, a clear way to reduce the high turnover rate for fundraisers. The payoff is clear for you, your colleagues, your organization, and your beneficiaries. Take a deep breath! Identifying a problem is the first step in fixing it. Then, use these five concrete opportunities, with supporting proof points, to start closing your communications-fundraising divide.I’ll follow up with specific, doable steps to getting to a unified voice and a fully integrated communications and marketing team. Stay tuned!Get more insights, talking points, and ways to do better in the 2016 Nonprofit Communications Trends Report.last_img read more

New Research Explores Why Women Deliver Alone in Nigeria

first_imgPosted on August 15, 2013February 16, 2017By: Sarah Blake, MHTF consultantClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)In general, discussions about care during labor and delivery tend to focus on two groups: women who deliverwith assistance from a skilled birth attendant, such as a midwife or doctor, and those who do not, as giving birth with assistance from a skilled provider is often considered the single most important intervention for ensuring that women deliver safely. In most settings, women in the second group give birth with assistance from someone, usually a traditional birth attendant. However, in some places, including Nigeria, where one in seven of the world’s maternal deaths occur, this group also includes women who give birth entirely alone. In “When women deliver with no one present in Nigeria: who, what, where and so what?“an article published earlier this month in PLOS ONE,  Bolaji M. Fapohunda and Nosakhare G. Orobaton, explore the factors that contribute to making the practice of giving birth with no one present (NOP) so common. Using data from the 2008 Demographic and Health Survey, the authors assessed a wide variety of factors that might contribute to the high proportion of NOP births and, in turn, may offer clues for efforts to change this situation. The authors found that the practice is heavily concentrated in the northern part of Nigeria, and associated with a set of sociodemographic, economic and social issues. From the article:Mother’s education, higher wealth quintiles, urban residence, decision-making autonomy, and a supportive environment for women’s social and economic security were inversely associated with NOP deliveries. Women’s autonomy and social standing were critical to choosing to deliver with skilled attendance, which were further amplified by economic prosperity. . . Programs that seek to improve the autonomy of women and their strategic participation in sound health seeking decisions will, most likely, yield better results with improvements in women’s education, income, jobs, and property ownership. As a short term measure, the use of conditional cash transfer, proven to work in several countries, including 18 in sub-Saharan Africa, is recommended. They also note that these sort of demand-side approaches are not the only – and may not even be the most important – factors, given that there are severe shortcomings in access and quality of maternal health services.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Event: The Maternal Imprint

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on March 24, 2014November 13, 2014Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)April 4th, 20148:30am-5:30am ESTThompson Room, Barker Center 12 Quincy Street Harvard University Cambridge, MAThe Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard and the Committee on Degrees in Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality invite you to join them on April 4th for an all-day symposium entitled The Maternal Imprint: An interdisciplinary symposium on the science of the maternal-fetal interface.The symposium will feature the following speakers; Cynthia Daniels, Janet Rich Edwards, Janet Golden , David Haig, Rebecca Kukla, Chris Kuzawa, and Sarah S. Richardson. The morning sessions will focus on biomedical studies while the afternoon sessions will concentrate on historical, philosophical and political reflections. The event is free and open to the public but you must register in advance.For more information and speaker bios, see the event website or contact [email protected] this:last_img read more

Part 1: What Women Want and Need vs. What They Get

first_imgPosted on September 4, 2014November 2, 2016By: Petra ten Hoope-Bender, Director of Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn and Child Health, ICS Integrare; Sheetal Sharma, Research and Knowledge Management Associate, ICS IntegrareClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post is part of our “Continuum of Care” blog series hosted by the Maternal Health Task ForceEsther has walked for 10 kilometers in the dusty red soil to her district health post in Mafinga, Iringa, Tanzania. She thinks she is pregnant; her belly is growing and her dada mkubwa (big sister) has said, “inaweza kuwa hivyo,” (it might be so) and she should go see a daktari (doctor).She enters the clinic and there is a long queue. Over 30 women are waiting, some with their babies, growing impatient; they have to go back home to their chores or to the shambaa (field). She is told that the nurse-midwife only works until lunchtime because she has to go to the next village to give vaccines. The nurse-midwife tells Esther that she needs to do a test but can’t because they are out of stock. Maybe Esther can buy it at the local duka ya dawa (pharmacy)? She also tells Esther to come regularly to the clinic to have her belly, weight and blood pressure checked and make sure she takes her iron and folic acid tablets. But the clinic is only open three mornings a week, so Esther may have to come multiple times in order to be seen even once.Overwhelmed, Esther wonders how she will manage over the next few months.So what is the care Esther received? Some of the standard questions we use to assess this include:Did she go to care in her first trimester of pregnancy?Has she had her four antenatal check-ups?Was she attended by a skilled birth attendant?To answer those questions, Esther would show the tablets she received, and say a doctor gave them to her because the provider wore a white coat. On any health-related census or household survey, Esther would be included as having received adequate care even though her care was far from adequate.But have we really measured the quality of care she received?To measure quality of care, we should ask Esther more detailed questions: whom she sees at the antenatal clinic and what is available there. Did she have access to vaccines, vitamins, antibiotics, and weighing scales? Did she feel she could easily access the antenatal services, with both the permission and monies to go? Were the services acceptable or respectful; did she feel she could ask any questions or be seen in privacy? Was it comprehensive antenatal care she received? Was she reassured during her pregnancy and counseled on what to expect and how to deal with emergencies? Was she advised where to have her baby and did she feel that she can visit the clinic at any time?In the Lancet series on Midwifery, we started our discussion and research from the perspective of what women and newborns need. We knew without evidence there is no basis for change. We also knew that for all women—including those like Esther—sexual, reproductive, maternal, and neonatal health (SRMNH) services need to shift from fragmented care to integrated care. The series shows that this care should be provided by a team of educated, regulated health care professionals working in an enabled health system delivering quality maternal and newborn care (QMNC). QMNC incorporates not only what type of care is delivered, but also how its organized and delivered. This includes quality care practices and optimising normal processes and using interventions only when indicated while showing respect for women and tailoring care to their needs. We developed a framework that brings this all together:QMNC FrameworkSource: Renfrew MJ, et al. Midwifery and quality care: findings from a new evidence-informed framework for maternal and newborn care. Lancet. 2014.What does this mean for the care providers?Care providers are hard put to deliver quality care outside an enabled environment. If you cannot provide the health care women need, communicate with colleagues, or refer women with complications, at some point you’re going to hit a wall. The QMNC framework can help health workers better define which care to provide and how. In addition, the framework identifies the support health workers need to deliver quality care and how education, regulation and an effective health care system contribute to building this support. In culmination of this research, a set of pragmatic steps for addressing the quality of SRMNH services has been created to facilitate moving from skilled care for some to quality maternal and newborn care for all.Stay tuned for Petra’s follow-up blog on this topic next Tuesday, September 9th.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:,This post is part of our “Continuum of Care” blog series hosted by the Maternal Health Task ForceEsther has walked for 10 kilometers in the dusty red soil to her district health post in Mafinga, Iringa, Tanzania. She thinks she is pregnant; her belly is growing and her dada mkubwa (big sister) has said, “inaweza kuwa hivyo,” (it might be so) and she should go see a daktari (doctor).She enters the clinic and there is a long queue. Over 30 women are waiting, some with their babies, growing impatient; they have to go back home to their chores or to the shambaa (field). She is told that the nurse-midwife only works until lunchtime because she has to go to the next village to give vaccines. The nurse-midwife tells Esther that she needs to do a test but can’t because they are out of stock. Maybe Esther can buy it at the local duka ya dawa (pharmacy)? She also tells Esther to come regularly to the clinic to have her belly, weight and blood pressure checked and make sure she takes her iron and folic acid tablets. But the clinic is only open three mornings a week, so Esther may have to come multiple times in order to be seen even once.Overwhelmed, Esther wonders how she will manage over the next few months.So what is the care Esther received? Some of the standard questions we use to assess this include:Did she go to care in her first trimester of pregnancy?Has she had her four antenatal check-ups?Was she attended by a skilled birth attendant?To answer those questions, Esther would show the tablets she received, and say a doctor gave them to her because the provider wore a white coat. On any health-related census or household survey, Esther would be included as having received adequate care even though her care was far from adequate.But have we really measured the quality of care she received?To measure quality of care, we should ask Esther more detailed questions: whom she sees at the antenatal clinic and what is available there. Did she have access to vaccines, vitamins, antibiotics, and weighing scales? Did she feel she could easily access the antenatal services, with both the permission and monies to go? Were the services acceptable or respectful; did she feel she could ask any questions or be seen in privacy? Was it comprehensive antenatal care she received? Was she reassured during her pregnancy and counseled on what to expect and how to deal with emergencies? Was she advised where to have her baby and did she feel that she can visit the clinic at any time?In the Lancet series on Midwifery, we started our discussion and research from the perspective of what women and newborns need. We knew without evidence there is no basis for change. We also knew that for all women—including those like Esther—sexual, reproductive, maternal, and neonatal health (SRMNH) services need to shift from fragmented care to integrated care. The series shows that this care should be provided by a team of educated, regulated health care professionals working in an enabled health system delivering quality maternal and newborn care (QMNC). QMNC incorporates not only what type of care is delivered, but also how its organized and delivered. This includes quality care practices and optimising normal processes and using interventions only when indicated while showing respect for women and tailoring care to their needs. We developed a framework that brings this all together:QMNC FrameworkSource: Renfrew MJ, et al. Midwifery and quality care: findings from a new evidence-informed framework for maternal and newborn care. Lancet. 2014.What does this mean for the care providers?Care providers are hard put to deliver quality care outside an enabled environment. If you cannot provide the health care women need, communicate with colleagues, or refer women with complications, at some point you’re going to hit a wall. The QMNC framework can help health workers better define which care to provide and how. In addition, the framework identifies the support health workers need to deliver quality care and how education, regulation and an effective health care system contribute to building this support. In culmination of this research, a set of pragmatic steps for addressing the quality of SRMNH services has been created to facilitate moving from skilled care for some to quality maternal and newborn care for all.Stay tuned for Petra’s follow-up blog on this topic next Tuesday, September 9th.last_img read more